Tag Archives: Texas

Themmigration Reform

A reasonable suspect

The only thing to fear is them themselves.
It is going around. There are at least ten other states, Utah, Georgia, Colorado, Maryland, Ohio, North Carolina, Texas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Nebraska among them, considering anti-immigration laws in the same spirit as the one passed by Arizona (ThinkProgress.org). Arizona’s new law requires law enforcement to enforce federal immigration laws “where reasonable suspicion exists that the person is an alien who is unlawfully present in the United States.” So, what would make you reasonably suspect someone? Language? Accent? Skin color? Hair type? Height? Weight? Surname? Intelligence? Car type? Living conditions? No driver’s license? Proximity to the border with Mexico? All of the above? Yes, that would be profiling. Constitutional? No telling from this court.

Los Angeles May Day rally in support of reform and rights - Lucas Jackson / Reuters

The Arizona law requires that those without documentation prove they are in the US legally (show me your papers), and are also to be charged with criminal trespass, confined and fined, at least, $500. The federal government does reimburse states and municipalities for confinement, so this may be nothing more than a way to turn a profit to Arizona for running prisons – sorta like parts of Texas does, but that’s another story.

In fairness, it should be pointed out that this law is not just about racism, xenophobia, fear, blame, census-forced redistricting and political penis measuring. It is also about funding civic services including schools, public safety, indigent medical care, unfair job competition – and, the despised, but desperately needed, deficit-financed by our children, federal funding. What it is not about, is solving any long-term problem or cause, civil decency or human rights.

What Goes Around Comes Around.
How soon we forget. Much of the west has a pretty short and convenient memory. Issues about who belongs where and who owns what is a pretty new idea. Arizona, and all the lands from Florida to California, has a much longer history being part of colonial Mexico/New Spain, than the United States – about 300 years. When we started migrating into Florida and out west about 160 years ago, we didn’t much care that we were the immigrants without documentation. On second thought, perhaps, Arizonians do remember.

In 1803, we bought the Louisiana Territories, which stretched to the north to the Dakotas and west to much of Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, and half of Colorado. By 1810, the illegals from the US outnumbered the Spanish in Florida and West Florida (southeastern Louisiana, southern Mississippi and southern Alabama) was annexed by that famously, over-reaching president, constitution-writing, James Madison. During the next decade, it became clear that the indigenous people who had lived in these territories for 20,000 years, were bad for business, so we began a century of genocide. Among the early annihilations were the Seminoles by an army commanded by Andrew Jackson, which launched his political career with this campaign in 1818. A year later, Jackson formally took control of Florida from the Spanish in an agreement to renounce all claims to Texas, but he didn’t mean it.

160 years ago, we were the illegal immigrants

By 1835, Jackson was dead set on getting all the land west to California. More accurately, he wanted California and didn’t much care about the rest. By that time, the US immigrants to East Texas outnumbered the Mexicans and declared their independence. Mexico, on the other hand, considered all of Texas still part of Mexico. The Texans, fearing they didn’t have enough guns, were bailed out by a free-spending Congress who forgave their debts and made them a state so they would qualify for all kinds of federal programs,  including fort building and war making. This really pissed off Mexico, so we got out our checkbook and offered a deal too good to refuse to buy most everything we wanted. The deal was turned down, so we picked a fight (there was no UN in 1846), won, and took what is now the western half of Texas, part of Colorado and all of New Mexico, Arizona, California, Utah, and Nevada. Which led, of course, to the civil war, but that, again, is another story.

My version of this history should indicate my bias that these Arizona children of principally European immigrants have an awfully lot in common with the Central and South American and Caribbean children of principally European immigrants.

Why is it that this issue has not been dealt with in Congress?
I dare say that immigration reform is the least popular initiative in America today. Everyone hates the problem and the remedy. There may never be 60 votes in the Senate to solve immigration issues.

Some of the issues:

    We have 108 miles of fence along our 1,969 mile southern border so far - should be finished in 2040

  • Secure our southern border. It is an almost ridiculous ambition to erect and guard the 1,969 miles we share, and yet, if we have laws, shouldn’t we enforce them? The current estimate for 700 miles of fence is $49 billion and would be expected to last just 25 years. Five years into it, we’ve gotten 106 miles finished (in those areas, immigrants must tunnel, use ladders or go around it) – at that rate, we will finish the fence in 2040, but then it will be worn out and need to be replaced. To date, we have also spent $1.1 billion on a seven mile virtual fence (high tech radars, cameras and motion detectors) that doesn’t work and are planning to build another 53 miles of it. The Obama administration has recently frozen funding until the private contractor can make it work or lobbyists can convince our government that it shouldn’t have to.
  • Path to citizenship. Their presence here breaks our laws which makes them ineligible to apply for citizenship. Should they return to their native country and apply, the application requires they affirm that they have not broken the laws of the US, which, of course, is the catch 22. They could lie, but our background checks are thorough and they would be caught. Any path to citizenship would require the ”A“ word – amnesty. Those supporting it have long included a call for a fine and penalty which wouldn’t be amnesty, but amnesty is what it would be called on Fox.
  • Sheer numbers. Depending on who is guessing, it is generally believed there are 10-20 million people living in the US illegally. Arizona entire population is 6.5 million, but, of course, those unlawfully present, don’t have two senators.
  • Family values. US-born children have rights to citizenship. Were their parents to be deported, do we split up the families?
  • Human rights. Among other issues, they have limited rights and protections in our courts and almost none in our immigration courts; are not allowed to vote; risk confiscation of property; are not legally allowed to work and if they do, are often are forced to work below minimum wage and without workplace safety standards; cannot legally obtain health insurance or a bank account; and are often victims of crime or preyed upon by nefarious business (for instance: check cashing companies) wishing to capitalize on their plight. Millions of them have lived here for decades, own property, operate businesses, attend church, obey laws and are frightened of detainment or deportation at all times. Tens of millions of people are living in a shadow economy without human rights and at odds with the ideals of American democracy.
  • Cost to provide services. Their children attend schools and sometimes require special language consideration; they use our hospitals, often as indigents; using fraudulent identification, many take advantage of food stamps and other government programs; government must pay for indirect services such as police and fire protection, roads, water, sewer, prisons, etc.
  • Armed services. They serve legally in our armed forces, but their status does not change upon their return.
  • Taxes and Social Security. Many pay only local sales taxes. Income taxes and social security can only be paid if they are using fraudulent identification.
  • Drugs and worse. Border crossings are all mixed up with drugs, violent crime, rape, forced labor, forced prostitution and the like.
  • Language. Many are concerned that undocumented workers don’t speak “American” and are afraid they’ll be called a name and not be properly insulted.
  • Jobs. US unemployment is around 10% and it is assumed it would be lower if workers here illegally would stop competing for jobs. Business on the other hand, needs these workers for specialized jobs, such as computer programming or picking Vidalia onions.
  • Employer enforcement. The Chambers of Commerce, who spend more than the national GOP or the national Dems on campaigns, don’t want businesses to get into the business of determining who’s here illegally.
  • The Central and South American and Caribbean standard of living. Until it improves, the faucet of aliens crossing our southern border won’t stop.
  • Blame. It isn’t healthy, but it is human nature.
  • Voting. Those gaining citizenship generally vote democrat.

How to solve it:

Incrementalism. Themmigration reform is complicated. The right says that thousand+ page bills are too complicated to be read, understood, spin, parse or pass. They are right. Short of some strategic major Senate scandals requiring resignation, illness or flip-flop, no omnibus bill is going to get to the floor. The right called for incremental bills on health care, finance and energy, why not take their bluff? Introduce a series of simple and separate bills addressing each of the issues. Bring a couple of important bills for vote. Something like:

  • Fully fund the fence even though it will never work, pay for more border patrols and the National Guard (as soon as they get home from Afghanistan), but require taxes on the the top 1% to pay for it.
  • Everyone here illegally, but with no felony criminal record, can pay an application fee that would go to the states, get a green card good for six-months and it comes with a method to pay social security and taxes. At the end of the time, they must either go home or apply for citizenship to get it renewed. During the time they here as documented workers, they would be required to do part-time community service.
  • Assuming no felony criminal record, parents, grandparents and siblings of children born in the US of illegal aliens, could get in the middle of the line for citizenship without fear of being deported or separated from their families in return for a paying an application fee and a one time $10,000 fine which could be financed, the proceeds of which, would go to the states, and four years of part-time community service.
  • Those here illegally under the age of 24, after serving in the US Armed Forces, would be in the front of the line for citizenship with no penalty or other requirement.
  • Everyone else here illegally, assuming no felony criminal record, can get in line for citizenship without fear of being deported or separated from their families in return for a paying an application fee and a one time $10,000 fine which could be financed, the proceeds of which, would go to the states, and eight years of part-time community service.
  • Business would have the responsibility of examining and reporting employee applicant status and be subject to a big fine for failure to do so – states would be responsible for ensuring compliance and collecting the fines.
  • Create a favored status for investment in Central and South American and Caribbean with all kinds of incentives the world might deem unfair, to raise their standard of living and give some of these people a chance to live in their own land and survive. Include in some extra incentives for Mexico to create a safety net for their people.

Simple and separate bills that get introduced, debated and voted on. Get them to the floor for an up, or down vote. The toughest wouldn’t pass. Some would, and that’d be a start.

The levels of irony should not be lost.

There’s never been a fence. If you have ever been in the Southwest, one thing seems clear: there is a lot of it and most all of it looks the same. Those lines we draw on the maps, mean a lot to those who draw them and profit from them, but seem pretty meaningless if you are just staring out on the prairie. It is little wonder that a person whose family is starving, doesn’t start walking north to the land of their fore-parents and a land where the majority of people are like them: hardworking, family-oriented, and children of immigrants in a new world.

“Civil disobedience” is a term coined by Henry David Thoreau in 1848 in an essay about his decision not to pay a poll tax to fund a war with Mexico and catching fugitive slaves. Civil disobedience. Isn’t an unenforceable, inexplicable and unjust law what all of the “us-versus-them” immigration debate is really about?

“Civil disobedience is the active refusal to obey certain laws, demands, and commands of a government, or of an occupying international power, using no form of violence. It is one of the primary methods of nonviolent resistance. In its most nonviolent form … it could be said that it is compassion in the form of respectful disagreement. …Civil disobedience is one of the many ways people have rebelled against unfair laws. It has been used in many well-documented nonviolent resistance movements in India… in Czechoslovakia’s Velvet Revolution and in East Germany to oust their communist dictatorships… in South Africa in the fight against apartheid, in the American Civil Rights Movement, in the Singing Revolution to bring independence to the Baltic countries from the Soviet Union, and recently in the 2004 Orange Revolution and 2005 Rose Revolution, among other various movements worldwide.” – Wikipedia

Suggested Reading:

The NRA are a bunch of yellow (insert euphemism here)

nra_logoRaccoons? Beavers? Hedgehogs? Rabbits? Squirrels? Trees? Dogs? Children? Other campers? Aliens? Socialists? Terrorists? Park Rangers? Our President? Other NRA members? What are they afraid of?

Congress passed a bill that, at least nine months from now, will curtail just a few of the many grotesque abuses of the credit card industry. Your NRA, which has a budget of $150 million to $200 million, much of which they spend on bribing your elected leaders, got language stuck in the bill that will allow anyone (not just NRA members) to carry guns in national parks. Wussies — the NRA and everyone who voted to tack a silly gun measure on to a serious bill intended to address a real economic and consumer issue. Reprobates — everyone of them — including the 105 Democrats in the House and 27 Democrats in the Senate who pandered their support for the NRA measure.

Here’s the evidence (from a great read in the National Parks Traveler): 273 million people visited national parks in 2006. Sadly, there were 11 homicides*; two went off cliffs in relationship disputes; one, a suicide. another a DUI. One, a victim of a drunken fight. Another, a shooting death by someone with an illegal firearm. One a drowning. We do not know how the others died, but, like the NRA, I suspect it must have been attacks by raccoon, beaver or terrorists. One note: there were 37 times as many bears killed by humans than humans killed by bears. Oops, I got my math wrong: 37 bear deaths by human, human deaths by bear 0.

The same year, the number one crime in national parks was liquor law violations (5,752). Number two, was carrying a gun (1,950). Number three, intoxication (843). Seems to this outsider that if we allowed guns in the parks, the number one and number three crimes might become more serious. Of course, that is easy for me to say, I’ve never been attacked by a squirrel or a terrorist in a national park.

There may be another explanation: protecting poachers (aka: hunters who think they have a right to shoot anything, anywhere without fear of prosecution). Poaching is big business with an organized illegal safari going for upwards of $10,000 per poacher. The park service has few law enforcement rangers (one ranger for every 118,000 acres), but (according to Science World) they still catch about 5,000 poachers a year and estimate that they don’t catch another 150,000-200,000 a year. Since it would take an enormous amount of luck to catch a poacher in the act (“Ranger, we’re just on a nature hike”) most of those caught end up being prosecuted on gun violations. Poachers are big winners with this new legislation.

Why are we even talking about this? Anyone not at a cocktail party sponsored by the NRA would read the second amendment and understand that our founding fathers were protecting the right of the states to have militias and for those in the militias to bear arms (sorry, for the bears). No one, not even Democrats, have mentioned (I dare you to Google it) taking away the state militias’ rights to bear arms. After all, we need them to continue fighting Bush’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

No. I must be missing something that Wyatt Earp (born in Kentucky, officially a Southerner) also overlooked when he and Wild Bill disarmed Dodge City. The right to commit suicide (on purpose or accidentally). The right to kill your spouse (on purpose or accidentally). The right to kill your children (on purpose or accidentally). The right to kill your friends (on purpose or accidentally). The right to protect yourself and your property while drinking. And the right to commit crimes with guns. We must protect these rights and quit trying to take the guns out of Charlton Heston’s cold dead hands.

Depending on whether you have basic cable, or the full spectrum, there were dozens of times as many police shootings on TV as actually happened — police actually shoot and kill about 200 criminals each year. During 2005 (the most recent year statistics have been released), gun owners, exercising their NRA-guaranteed right, shot and killed over 3,000 of their children, wounding ten times as many. In the same period, the rest of the world combined (not including our wars), didn’t add up to our domestic output.

Listen, I’m fine if Texas wants to spend what money they have left in their former governor’s economy on buying and hoarding guns (way up since Obama’s been in office). They are planning to secede anyway and I bet the Pentagon, or the Mexican drug cartel, can handle whatever they have in their gun cabinets. Just stay out of our parks, or we’ll sic a beaver on you.

____________

* Tom Coburn, (R-OK), and sponsor the NRA Amendment to the Senate bill states in his press release that the number of 2006 homicides our National Parks and the US Fish and Wildlife Service** public lands was 16, and also includes statistics for rape, robbery, kidnappings and assault. He cites the National Park Service and the Fish and Wildlife Service as his source, but they do not collect and publish such statistics. This information could only have come from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program, though it beats the heck out me how it could have been compiled accurately from the data available.

**The US Fish and Wildlife Service manages more than 150 million acres, 550 national wildlife refuges and other units of the Refuge System, plus 37 wetland management districts – in all 50 states and many near metropolitan areas.

How your Southern Senators voted (Alphabetical by Senator Name): 29 Yay; 3 Nay; 2 Not Voting

Alexander (R-TN), Nay
Begich (D-AK), Yea
Bond (R-MO), Yea
Bunning (R-KY), Yea
Burr (R-NC), Yea
Byrd (D-WV), Yea
Cardin (D-MD), Nay
Chambliss (R-GA), Yea
Coburn (R-OK), Yea
Cochran (R-MS), Yea
Corker (R-TN), Yea
Cornyn (R-TX), Yea
DeMint (R-SC), Yea
Graham (R-SC), Yea
Hagan (D-NC), Yea
Hutchison (R-TX), Yea
Inhofe (R-OK), Yea
Isakson (R-GA), Yea
Landrieu (D-LA), Yea
Lincoln (D-AR), Yea
Martinez (R-FL), Yea
McCaskill (D-MO), Nay
McConnell (R-KY), Yea
Mikulski (D-MD), Not Voting
Murkowski (R-AK), Yea
Nelson (D-FL), Yea
Pryor (D-AR), Yea
Rockefeller (D-WV), Not Voting
Sessions (R-AL), Yea
Shelby (R-AL), Yea
Vitter (R-LA), Yea
Warner (D-VA), Yea
Webb (D-VA), Yea
Wicker (R-MS), Yea