Tag Archives: finance

Buying Washington with our money

$3.8 billion. That’s how much the people you elected to Congress and the Senate took from finance, insurance and real estate lobbyists in the past 10 years. That’s right, billion.

What did they buy? Protection from regulation that would protect consumers and investors. Protection from laws that would stop the outrageous risks, self-dealing, market making, collusion and investor deception. Protection from paying ordinary taxes on their extraordinary incomes. And protection from failure to the tune of more taxpayer money than, according to The Intelligence Daily,

“… the cost of all US wars (including such events as the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War, the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan, the invasion of Panama, the Kosovo War and numerous other small conflicts), the Louisiana Purchase, the New Deal, the Marshall Plan and the NASA Space Program combined.”

With Congress safely in their vest pockets, the financial sector has thrived and is expected this week to announce record bonus payments – “… expected to be 30 to 40 percent higher than 2008’s.” Wall Street and the mega-banks profits have so bloated during this period that, according to Robert Creamer,

“of every 12.5 dollars earned in the United States, one goes to the financial sector, much of which, let us recall, produces nothing.”

What wait, you must be thinking, what about the regulation and reforms we were promised to keep from having to save all the firms too big to fail from failing again? Surely voters won’t stand for more of the same. The tough votes will have to be made, right? We’re going to re-regulate these companies, get transparency, watch them and enforce our laws, right?

Hate to get your hopes up. On December 11, 2009, the House passed H.R. 4173, the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2009 – according to the DNC, the bill is the  “most sweeping financial regulation since the Great Depression.” DNC Communications Director Brad Woodhouse, said,

“One year after nearly the worst financial collapse in our nation’s history — a collapse brought on by the excessive greed and risk taking of Wall Street and by the anything goes regulatory environment put in place by Republicans — not one Republican in the House thinks that consumers deserve additional protections or that the practices of Wall Street should be curbed.”

The Dems writing the bill, apparently, don’t think so either. The fix was in. To get the 1,300 page bill to a vote, they caved on the enforcement provisions so that the bill falls somewhere between a tediously long suggestion and a PR stunt. Sound tough to voters, but make sure the market sees the secret wink and the nod. Sure, the bill would shuffle the regulators, asks the Treasury to report stuff to Congress, requires a lot more forms to be filled out, and adds some councils and boards. It prohibits a few new things, but also repeals some regulation on the books that could make things worse. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) voted against the bill, believing the legislation does not go far enough. On his website, Kucinich noted the loopholes in the bill “that sophisticated financial industry insiders will exploit with ease.”

But hey, the Senate just got a hold of it. Don’t expect it to be better, shorter, or even get to a vote until spring, if then.


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