Mother Nature Rules Reality

Mother Nature Protecting the Earth (licensed from Dreamstime)This has been a tough week for politicians and the faith-based stupid. The most admired leaders of both parties in a long-running suicide pact with our most trusted sources of news and their corporate masters had convinced most of the electorate that nuclear energy is safe and clean. Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Kyshtym and a dozen or so other accidents long ignored, Mother Nature weighed in on that this week, and in a few seconds of shaking, not counting the aftershocks, did in NE Japan what it typically takes an entire Godzilla movie to achieve – this time, it was real. This time, we were all shaken. This time, even Republicans can’t spin the reality of the danger back into a lie. Nuclear energy is not safe and it never was clean.

The Tokyo Electric Power Company’s (TEPCO) Fukushima* Daiichi power plant is 40 years old and was scheduled to shut down in February until an enlightened Japanese government in a collusion of greed determined the plants would be safe for another 10 years. These Japanese plants use the same American/General Electric system that is used by 23 reactors in the US, including some in Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina – plants of a similar age, scheduled to be retired, but re-certified safe by our enlightened corporate-owned leaders.

Mother Nature routinely demonstrates man’s stupidity for ignoring reality by revealing the consequences of hubris. Decades of development and destruction of wetlands on the Mississippi caused the widespread destruction of New Orleans after Katrina. It was less than a year ago, with the echo of our President saying deep water drilling was safe, when we saw that it wasn’t and never will be in the Gulf of Mexico. Corporations that use hydraulic fracturing (frac’ing) to get cheaper natural gas, do so with the knowledge that it contaminates and depletes our groundwater. Industries that routinely use toxic chemicals do so knowing their waste might kill the locals, but their courts will prevent their liability. We prevent forest fires that cause massive fires. We dam rivers and cause droughts. We burn fossil fuels and change our climate – the top 11 hottest years on record have been in the last 13 years. We’ve scattered depleted uranium waste in our wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. We let Appalachia coal power plants mass coal slurry causing one of the worst environmental disasters in history. We remove mountain tops for cheap coal and then leave them for future generations. We defunded the superfund and now toxic sites just sit ticking… waiting for Mother Nature to get pissed off again.

Many corporations, left on their own, consider human death and the destruction of the environment collateral damage of profit. All politicians, however, consider truth collateral damage of election.

* Not pronounced, “Fuk You Shima.”

6 thoughts on “Mother Nature Rules Reality

  1. Mark Dohle

    Yes, it is tragic in Japan…. I can’t fault anything you have written and I, sad to say, share your seeming distain for politicians, though there must be some good ones out there somewhere.

    Peace
    Mark

    Reply
  2. Brenden

    Democrat-controlled levy boards who used their taxation authority to line their pockets rather than fix the levies helped doom New Orleans. Much of the Katrina tragedy was predictable and preventable, very much unlike Japan. The SoCo nuclear plants have been operating safely and efficiently in the Southeast for decades helping to keep electricity rates lower than the national average. Politicking against them because of a 9.0 earthquake in Japan is ridiculous. If a 9-er hits Votgle or Hatch, then we’ll have some other problems to worry about. But we should have a couple million years or so before that becomes a threat.

    No nukes nor coal, natural gas, oil to burn? And what fuels we can burn we cannot extract from our own lands and instead have to funnel Islamist dictators? Are we supposed to live in the trees of our pristine swamps? Eat tree bark and ignite our excrement to stay warm? Live how ever you choose — but your preferences hardly seem to reflect those of most people.

    How can progressives on one hand promise free healthcare and state retirement for everyone then with the other hand take away 99 percent of the electrical generation capacity? Progressives must realize there must be some economic activity to support their nanny state. That economic activity requires a fuel source (please save the solar panel/wind farm/switchgrass nonsense for the children).

    Reply
    1. John Hickman

      That should always be “Democratic-controlled” rather than “Democrat-controlled” in the same way that it always should be “Republican-controlled” rather than “Repub-controlled.” Basic respect begins with allowing others to name themselves.

      Also what does “funnel Islamist dictators” mean? There seems to be something missing in that sentence.

      Reply
  3. Tom Ferguson

    Conservation, wind, solar are all competitive with nuclear economically (see http://www.IEER.org for a free download, Carbon Free and Nuclear Free, an energy roadmap)… these alternative sources have the added advantage that in case of an accident you don’t have to evacuate.

    Reply
  4. Lee Leslie Post author

    From the Daily Beast (http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2011-03-16/nuclear-power-plants-ranking-americas-most-vulnerable/full/):

    Most Vulnerable U.S. Nuclear Plants
    Based on the input of more than a half-dozen experts in nuclear energy, nuclear engineering and risk assessment, The Daily Beast ranked the country’s power plant sites based on three, equally-weighted tenets: risk of natural disaster, safety performance assessments and surrounding population. In other words, which nuclear power plants are located in the most dangerous physical locations, have the weakest relative operating conditions and would affect the greatest number of people should an unforeseeable emergency occur?

    (Excerpted with just the Southern List)

    #7, Watts Bar
    Location: Spring City, TN (60 miles southwest of Knoxville, TN) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 1123 
Year Operating License Issued: 1996 
Population within 50 Miles: 1,041,466 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 3 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 0 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 10 to 20

    #9, Virgil C. Summer
    Location: Jenkinsville, SC (26 miles northwest of Columbia, SC) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 966 
Year Operating License Issued: 1982 
Population within 50 Miles: 1,138,816 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 3 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 10 to 15

    #10, Sequoyah
    Location: Soddy-Daisy, TN (16 miles northeast of Chattanooga, TN) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 1148; Unit 2: 1126 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1980; Unit 2: 1981 
Population within 50 Miles: 1,048,818 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 3 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 0 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 15 to 25

    #15, Waterford
    Location: Killona, LA (25 miles west of New Orleans, LA) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 1250 
Year Operating License Issued: 1985 
Population within 50 Miles: 2,113,087 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 1 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 40 -- 60 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 10 to 20

    #16, Arkansas Nuclear One
    Location: London, AR (6 miles west-northwest of Russellville, AR) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 843; Unit 2: 995 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1974; Unit 2: 1978 
Population within 50 Miles: 295,832 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 0 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 25 to 35

    #17, Vogtle
    Location: Waynesboro, GA (26 miles southeast of Augusta, GA) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 1109; Unit 2: 1127 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1987; Unit 2: 1989 
Population within 50 Miles: 712,672 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 40 -- 60 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 10 to 15

    #18, Edwin I. Hatch
    Location: Baxley, GA (20 miles south of Vidalia, GA) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 876; Unit 2: 883 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1974; Unit 2: 1978 
Population within 50 Miles: 426,725 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 40 -- 60 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 15

    #19, Catawba
    Location: York, SC (18 miles south of Charlotte, NC) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 1129 ; Unit 2: 1129 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1985; Unit 2: 1986 
Population within 50 Miles: 2,461,326 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 10 to 15

    #21, McGuire
    Location: Huntsville, NC (17 miles north of Charlotte, NC) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 1100; Unit 2: 1100 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1981; Unit 2: 1983 
Population within 50 Miles: 2,647,599 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 15

    #22, Shearon Harris
    Location: New Hill, NC (20 miles southwest of Raleigh, NC) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 900 
Year Operating License Issued: 1986 
Population within 50 Miles: 2,337,716 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 15

    #23, Surry
    Location: Surry, VA (17 miles northwest of Newport News, VA) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 799; Unit 2: 799 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1972; Unit 2: 1973 
Population within 50 Miles: 2,354,094 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 1 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 40 -60 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 10

    #24, Joseph M. Farley
    Location: Columbia, AL (18 miles south of Dothan, AL) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 851; Unit 2: 860 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1977; Unit 2: 1981 
Population within 50 Miles: 397,337 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 1 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 40 -- 60 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 15 to 25

    #26, North Anna
    Location: Louisa, VA (40 miles northwest of Richmond, VA) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 980.5; Unit 2: 972.9 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1978; Unit 2: 1980 
Population within 50 Miles: 1,795,918 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 10

    #27, Callaway
    Location: Fulton, MO (25 miles east-northeast of Jefferson City, MO) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 1236 
Year Operating License Issued: 1984 
Population within 50 Miles: 497,276 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 0 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 15 to 20

    #30, River Bend
    Location: St. Francisville, LA (24 miles north-northwest of Baton Rouge, LA) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 989 
Year Operating License Issued: 1985 
Population within 50 Miles: 895,543 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 1 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 15 to 25

    #32, Grand Gulf
    Location: Port Gibson, MS (20 miles south of Vicksburg, MS) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 1297 
Year Operating License Issued: 1984 
Population within 50 Miles: 376,227 
Relative Safety Rating: middle third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 1 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 30 to 35

    #35, Comanche Peak
    Location: Glen Rose, TX (40 miles southwest of Fort Worth, TX) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 1200; Unit 2: 1150 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1990; Unit 2: 1993 
Population within 50 Miles: 1,672,150 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 0 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 25 to 30

    #39, South Texas Project
    Location: Bay City, TX (90 miles southwest of Houston, TX) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 1410; Unit 2: 1410 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1988; Unit 2: 1989 
Population within 50 Miles: 298,473 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 0 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 40 -- 60 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 15

    #44, Browns Ferry
    Location: Athens, AL (32 miles west of Huntsville, AL) 
Reactors: 3 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 1065; Unit 2: 1104; Unit 3: 1115 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1973; Unit 2: 1974; Unit 3: 1976 
Population within 50 Miles: 927,485 
Relative Safety Rating: middle third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 0 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 20 to 30

    #49, Crystal River
    Location: Crystal River, FL (80 miles north of Tampa, FL) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 838 
Year Operating License Issued: 1976 
Population within 50 Miles: 974,647 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 0 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 40-60 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 10

    #50, St. Lucie
    Location: Jensen Beach, FL (10 miles southeast of Ft. Pierce, FL) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 839; Unit 2: 839 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1976; Unit 2: 1983 
Population within 50 Miles: 1,070,699 
Relative Safety Rating: bottom third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 0 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 60+ 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 0 to 5

    #51, Brunswick
    Location: Southport, NC (40 miles south of Wilmington, NC) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 938; Unit 2: 937 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1976; Unit 2: 1974 
Population within 50 Miles: 420,186 
Relative Safety Rating: middle third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 60+ 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 10

    #54, Turkey Point
    Location: Homestead, FL (20 miles south of Miami, FL) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 3: 720; Unit 4: 720 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 3: 1972; Unit 4: 1973 
Population within 50 Miles: 3,383,332 
Relative Safety Rating: middle third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 0 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 60+ 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 0 to 5

    #55, Calvert Cliffs
    Location: Lusby, MD (40 miles south of Annapolis, MD) 
Reactors: 2 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 873; Unit 2: 862 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1974; Unit 2: 1976 
Population within 50 Miles: 3,367,816 
Relative Safety Rating: middle third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 1 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 5 to 10

    #61, Oconee
    Location: Seneca, SC (30 miles west of Greenville, SC) 
Reactors: 3 
Electrical Output (megawatts): Unit 1: 846; Unit 2: 846; Unit 3: 846 
Year Operating License Issued: Unit 1: 1973; Unit 2: 1973; Unit 3: 1974 
Population within 50 Miles: 1,320,156 
Relative Safety Rating: top third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 10 to 15

    #65, H. B. Robinson
    Location: Hartsville, SC (26 miles northwest of Florence, SC) 
Reactors: 1 
Electrical Output (megawatts): 710 
Year Operating License Issued: 1970 
Population within 50 Miles: 855,396 
Relative Safety Rating: top third 
Risk of Natural Disasters:
    Likelihood of Earthquake (scale 0-6): 2 
Expected Number of Hurricanes in Next Century: 20 -- 40 
Miles to Potentially Active Volcano: not a factor 
Significant Tornadoes (1921-1995): 10 to 15

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