Get Me Off The Road, Please

Driving on the interstates is inherently irrationalDriving on the interstates is inherently irrational. To think that the drivers of all those other cars would voluntarily and routinely entrust theirs and their family’s lives to me is nuts. Based solely on a ten minute driving test in high school, with no knowledge of  my driving skills, my car maintenance or my attention span, and regardless of whether I’m returning a call, Twittering, checking email, drinking coffee or booze, locating an iPod playlist, picking my nose, watching a DVD, lost or lost in thought, they have enough faith in me to share the highway at speeds guaranteed to to kill and maim. With my car aimed directly at theirs, they ride along fearlessly believing they are more likely to fall asleep from boredom than my minimum breaking distance. Why do they do it? What makes where they are going so important? Why do they trust me completely at 75 miles an hour, but while standing still they lock their doors? Beat’s me. My driving scares the bejesus out of me. It’s a miracle we make it safely any time I drive. I believe I need to be stopped. I’m hoping all those other drivers will organize and decide it is time to get me, and all the others like me, off the road. Trains come to mind. Trains that go places people, especially drivers like me, want to go. Modern, fast, clean, energy efficient trains. Spurs the economy. Creates jobs. And will save lives – maybe yours. Think about it. Then write your Congresspeople. Your life may depend it on it.

3 thoughts on “Get Me Off The Road, Please

  1. Meg Gerrish

    We had a most wonderful ride to Maine a season or two ago, by train. Decent food. Got to drink ourselves silly without worry. Met and enjoyed the company of total strangers. Relaxed and laughed. Couldn’t read, though. The train waggles all over, so it was impossible to read. Still, I wish I wish I wish that train service would be expanded.

    But what to do for local errands? We’re toying with the idea of selling the household car and replacing it with a one-horsepower conveyance: one horse. No insurance required. The input of oats, carrots, hay and clean water, plus an occasional visit with the vet for maintenance, rather than polluting the air, creates an output that’s useful in the garden. The funny thing is, in our suburban neighborhood, we could actually pull this off. Thinking on it…

    Reply
    1. Lee Leslie Post author

      Whereas, we sold our 2nd car and kept the one that was paid off. Signed up for zipcar (there at least 20 zip cars within three blocks), walk, use the bus (the #45 passes just outside and goes directly to Manuel’s), Marta and car pooling as often as possible. I bet we haven’t started the car in a month (that’s mainly about needing brakes and tires). See you soon, I hope -- perhaps, Maine in a couple of months?

      Reply
      1. Meg Gerrish

        We’re fortunate that the work vehicles and household car are all paid off. But does it stop there? Oh no no no. The work “fleet” need full insurance packages (read, liability) so they are a constant strain on the dwindling, construction industry resources. And the household car, which I rarely drive — don’t tell anyone, but my license expired two years ago — also requires insurance and occasional maintenance. Also an open drain pipe. At least a horse would provide a contribution to the garden and therefore, the dinner table. Although, I would be thrilled to have Zip service around here. If only.

        I’ll have my license next month (assuming I pass the test), and will be help with the driving to Maine, hopefully late spring! It’s just a shell of a house so far, but a client just gave us a barely used gas stovetop, hood and plate warmer, so with the sink Tom already scrounged, we practically have the kitchen in place. — To Maine!

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